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Denmark

Denmark, or The Kingdom of Denmark as it is officially known, is a beautiful country north of Germany and south of Norway. Denmark has many attractions for visitors including museums and amusement parks, as well as its architecture, historical sites and scenic beauty. It is perhaps best known for its beautiful architecture and design. The people of Denmark have been ranked the happiest in the world (2013 World Happiness Report and other earlier reports).

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Denmark Visas

Denmark Visit Visas

Visitors to Denmark may enter on a Schengen visa.

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Denmark Work Visas

People from outside Denmark or the EU/EEA must apply for a work permit (visa) in...

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Denmark Student Visas

Studying the Denmark requires a residence permit (other than citizens of Denmark...

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Denmark Migration

The Danish Green Card scheme allows a person to live and work in Denmark if they...

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About Denmark

Climate

Denmark is a Scandinavian country with a cold climate. The weather in Denmark is maritime and can be quite unpredictable, changing from bright sunshine to fog and rain.  There are four seasons,  though it sometimes seems like only two with winter running into spring and short summers.  Winter consists of short days and long nights. Temperatures range from an average of 3 degrees Celcius in winter to 15 degrees in summer. It does snow but often not for long.  It is important to dress well for the cold climate in Denmark.

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Culture

The Danish culture is based on “Jante Law”.  It states that everyone is equal, no one is special and everyone should be treated as such. As such it is very egalitarian and welcoming of all people, no matter their occupation, status, race or sexual orientation.  There is a lack of discrimination and everyone is treated fairly. The Danish language is Danish, or Dansk, which belongs to the Germanic family of languages within the Indo-European languages. You should learn the Danish language (at least a little) if you plan to live here. If you can speak a little Danish, it is appreciated; however, English and German is also widely spoken. The best way to adapt to the culture of Denmark is to get involved in the Danish way of life.

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Transport

Denmark is easy to travel around, with a good public transport network. Public transport in Denmark uses a common pricing and zoning system, including trains, metro, bus, cars and taxis. There are also ferries to Germany, Sweden, Norway, Greenland, Iceland and UK. Most people in Denmark have a bicycle and this provides a cheap and environmentally-friendly form of transport around the city.

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Health Care

Denmark has a high quality health care system.  Hospitals in Denmark have excellent facilities, and most doctors and dentists speak English. The Danish health service is financed through income tax, so publicly-funded medical treatment in Denmark is available to all Danish residents and EU citizens free of charge. Free emergency treatment is available to visitors from all other countries.

The Danish health system is divided into two sectors:

Primary health care: this is for general health problems and is usually the first point of contact if you require general medical treatment. Services in this sector are available to everyone, and include treatments from general practitioners, dentists, physiotherapists, etc.

Hospital sector:  for patients who require more specialised medical treatment, for example intensive care or the need for specialist equipment.

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Recreation and Sports

Danish people enjoy sports, whether playing or watching.  Almost two thirds of all children and young people in Denmark play sport in their leisure time. Football is the most popular sport. For a more leisurely sport, try fishing which is also popular there. There are many sporting clubs and associations in Denmark.  Denmark has been successful in hosting many major events, thanks to its strong sports club system.

The Danish sports scene is characterised by three important and interconnected sectors: government, private and civil. In the civil sector, the sports associations are primarily represented by three national organisations: National Olympic Committee and Sports Confederation of Denmark (DIF), Danish Gymnastics and Sports Associations (DGI) and The Danish Federation of Company Sports (DFIF).  The Danish clubs function on voluntary work, openness and joint responsibility. Many important tasks as club coaches or sport officials are carried out on a voluntary basis.

 

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Part Time Work

Many tertiary students in Denmark engage in part time work. International (Non-EU/EEA/Swiss) students may work in Denmark for up to 15 hours a week and full-time during the university summer holidays. However, this requires a work permit (not just a student visa). People must be aged 18 or over to be eligible for a work permit. Chances of employment are better if you speak Danish. Some international students find part time work in bars or restaurants. Others distribute newspapers, work in telemarketing or get jobs where specific foreign language skills are required. Some students are lucky enough to find employment relevant to their studies. .

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Night Life

There are many bars and disco in Denmark, particularly in Copenhagen. Jazz is popular there. People are so friendly and fun, so it’s a good place to meet new friends and enjoy good Denmark beer.Usually you need to pay an entrance fee. Copenhagen’s nightlife is rich and diverse and very welcoming. Whether you prefer cosy bars and cafes, live music, or cutting edge clubs, there is something to suit your taste.

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