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Dream Migration Destinations Reported – Canada, Australia and NZ popular

Posted on February  03 , 2014

Some of the most popular countries for people to migrate to, whether or not they are able to, include Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Switzerland and Singapore among the top choices. The latest Gallup’s Potential Net Migration Index (PNMI) (released Jan 2014) shows results of a survey of about 520,000 interviews conducted across 154 countries surveyed between 2010-2012. It shows adults’ response as to whether they would like to migrate from their country and to what country, if they could move anywhere they wanted. The PNMI score is the estimated number of adults who say they would like to move permanently out of a country (if the opportunity arose), subtracted from the estimated number who say they would like to move into it, as a proportion of the total adult population. The higher the resulting positive PNMI score, the larger the potential net adult population gains. Countries with the highest PNMI scores in Europe include Switzerland (150%), Sweden (78%), Spain (74%) and UK (62%). This indicates that these are popular countries for people to migrate to and less popular to leave. In the Americas regions, Canada scored the highest with 160%, followed by the USA, at 60%. Potential net migration in the Middle-East and North Africa was largely in the negatives, indicating a desire to move out of the countries rather than into; however the highest figures were reported in Saudi Arabia with a whopping 218% and Kuwait, on 198%. Potential net migration in Australasia was highest in Australia (136%), followed closely by New Zealand (134%) – in reverse order to the 2007-2009 results. Singapore was the next most popular at 129%, though this was down from 219% in the previous index. PNMI scores across developing Asia continued to be as negative as they have been in previous years. While sub-Saharan Africa has the highest negative PNMI of all global regions, scores in many countries improved — largely because of declining desire to migrate. The biggest improvement is evident in East Africa, particularly in Tanzania and the Somaliland region, where scores are not nearly as negative as they were in previous years. While Gallup’s findings reflect people’s wishes rather than their intentions or actual migration figures, they still provide useful information about how populations could potentially change. This may not be realistic however. For instance, the New Zealand figure indicates a potential increase in the current population of 4,242,048 to 9,926,393 if everyone who wanted to move there could! According to a leading New Zealand sociologist, Prof Paul Spoonley, New Zealand’s infrastructure would not be able to support such an increase. Declining potential net migration scores in many countries — even those that are highly desired destination countries — largely reflect a declining worldwide desire to migrate in the aftermath of global economic downturn. As economic conditions improve, the idea of migrating and some of these destinations may become more attractive again. Further details on the study and research method are available on http://www.gallup.com/ In all countries, potential for people to migrate there is limited by the immigration rules in place. For further information about migration to your desired country, contact The Visa Centre.